Best Places To Retire In U.S. And Abroad – NASDAQ.com

A Search for Best Places

Bonnie Hayman, an International Living correspondent who lives in the coastal town of San Juan del Sur, found a two-bedroom, two-bathroom home with an ocean view for $132,000. “I would never have been able to live in an ocean-view home in the States,” she said in International Living’s report. “I pay real estate taxes of just $151 a year.”

Debbie Goehring and her husband, who spend $1,089 a month to live on Ometepe Island, joined the Vivian Pellas Metropolitan Hospital health discount program in Managua, Nicaragua’s capital. “Built to U.S. standards, this hospital provides excellent services to expats at about a quarter of what it would cost in the U.S.,” she said.

Source: Best New Places To Retire In U.S. And Abroad – NASDAQ.com

Isn’t it about finding your best places to retire?

Hey reader(s) and robots! Here is another article about how Nicaragua should be on the list when considering low-cost with quality-living places retirement spots overseas.

There’s also a bit on low-cost cities in the US to live, which is good, I mean there are places in the the US that are perfectly appropriate places but maybe just don’t have the romance of moving abroad to some? I’m asking here folks, let me know what you think.

They went to a couple of the “go-to” expats here for the money quotes, in this case literally, and more power to ’em! If you click through to read, what stood out most is Peru, that a single person could live there for $500-$600 per month in a nice pleasant situation.

Could you live like this? (Ko Pha Ngan)

Could you live like this? (Ko Pha Ngan)

Here’s my comment I put on the story’s website:

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Well Scott you do have a point there, don’t you? Peru looks pretty good here too, I wonder if it’s so? As usual readers are urged to do your own research and spend lots of time on the ground before making any major decisions, including buying property overseas.
But really this is a very standard “retire cheap in Latin America (with one SE Asian country thrown in) that relies heavily on outfits that promote the “sizzle” like IL steer you towards Gringo Accumulation Zones (GAZs). As mentioned about Nicaragua, San Juan del Sur, Granada and now also, Ometepe Island. Those are all lovely places but there is a lot more to the country (and the people!) than that!
The sometimes (or oftentimes) challenging aspect of actually living here is sort of another story not told by most of these sorts of articles, however informative they may be as one small aspect of living abroad, which is cost and quality of living.
If readers decide to visit Nicaragua, get in touch for our “soft landing” service.

Cheers, Mike @ El Porton Verde, Managua

4 thoughts on “Best Places To Retire In U.S. And Abroad – NASDAQ.com

  1. I think you responded very well. I had no idea that I was quoted in an International Living article. I can’t remember how that even happened. That is why I try to be real about living in Nicaragua when writing articles on my blog. Some people don’t want to hear about the challenges of living here, instead they only want to dream about living abroad. Don’t get me wrong, we love it here, but if people hear the “real” stories and understand that Nicaragua is not paradise, their bubbles burst and many keep searching for another place to dream about that offers “paradise” like most of the International Living articles.

  2. Hahaha.

    The advantage of Managua or one of the less colonized department capitals is that the Nicaraguans are the ones doing things in those cities and there’s less likelihood for the gringos to believe that if not for them, Nicaragua would be perpetually back in 2002. Jinotega has people building and rehabbing — several places on my block alone — and this is not driven by expanded foreign presence.

Hey reader, watcha think?