Suggestions for weeklong vacation with three teenagers

Last reply was
61

Hello! I’m exploring options for me to take my three nieces/nephew on vacation for about a week. Nicaragua is at the top of my list, having previously been to Costa Rica and Guatemala. Central America is so much fun. For the teenagers it will be their first trip out of the country (outside of the midwest USA, really). I’m looking for a fun, standard itinerary that perhaps will stoke a love of travel in them. All three kids are 14/15 years old, and I’m looking to travel in the dry season – maybe as early as this April. What are your thoughts on an itinerary? Some notes:

  • No party destinations
  • I’d like for them to see and learn about cultural differences and humanitarian issues
  • We’re from a flat area, so we definitely need to hike mountains. I’d categorize the three of them as all having a “medium” fitness level. Cerro Negro, Telica? Quetzeltrekkers?
  • Can we see lava anywhere in Nicaragua?
  • Waterfalls would be great
  • We’ll need some beach time. Preferably somewhere quiet where I’d rent a house and we can explore nearby on foot.
  • We should visit one of the colonial cities. Leon or Granada?
  • Ometepe looks really cool. The volcanoes there sound too difficult to hike for their skill level.

Thanks for your help. The Thorn Tree is a great community.

 

Response from elportonverde

mike_elportonverde ONLINE 23 days ago Greetings Doug: Yes you can see hot lava in Nicaragua at the Masaya Volcano during the night tour. What I would suggest is similar to likeeveryoneelse’s recommendations. I’d suggest the loop from Managua-Leon-Esteli (Somoto Canyon)-Matagalpa-Granada as a rough itinerary. In Leon you can get your beach day in at Las Peñitas, do the volcano boarding, see the town itself (go up to the top of the cathedral for photos), then get to Esteli (there’s a nice waterfall just before you get to the town), overnight in Esteli or Somoto, then the next morning do Somoto Canyon (your teens will love it!), there are other hikes in the area too. Next day go to Matagalpa (more nice hikes, coffee country), then get back to Granada for the last couple of days. Cheers, Mike @ El Portón Verde, Managua

Source: Suggestions for weeklong vacation with three teenagers

The Somoto Canyon in Northern Nicaragua Hobbitschuster

Airbnb sees opportunity to promote another type of tourism in Nicaragua • El Nuevo Diario

Approximately 50% of tourists coming to Nicaragua through the Airbnb application are looking to stay in shared spaces, said Carlos Muñoz, Public Policy and Government Relations Manager for Airbnb for Central America and the Caribbean.

That means, according to Muñoz, that this type of tourist shares the lodging with another person who lives in the house, which in his opinion “creates an immense possibility of a very strong and rich cultural exchange, which promotes the possibility of that person wanting to return to Nicaragua.”

According to the official of Airbnb, the tourist agencies could take advantage of that characteristic to attract more tourists to the country.

“Normally in the region where I work, the Caribbean and Central America, 70% of tourists rent a whole house, that is, do not cohabit with a family or another person. They rent the whole house to go and spend with the family, “he said.

“In Nicaragua I see it as a great opportunity to develop this type of tourism that I mentioned, which is a tourism with a very cultural experience, well personalized, that differentiates this country from others in the region. And it should be noted that many of the tourists who come to Nicaragua are looking for this type of experience and it is an experience that is not achieved in the traditional tourism market,” he said.

“Collaborative Economy”

Airbnb, the world’s premier hosting business that has no place physically speaking, emerged in 2008 in San Francisco, United States, as an idea of ​​two young college students.

According to Carlos Muñoz, the application has more than two million properties registered, in more than 34,000 cities in 191 countries. It is a company valued at US $ 30 billion.

In Nicaragua there are over 1,000 properties active on Airbnb.

Currently Nicaraguan lodgings registered in Airbnb are concentrated in the Pacific of the country. “There are a lot of holiday homes, beach houses, but at the same time there are houses in Managua, in the mountains and some other offer on the Caribbean coast,” said Carlos Muñoz.

For Muñoz, it is difficult to predict the growth that the use of the Airbnb system of business in Nicaragua could have during the next years.

“Airbnb is an open platform. It is not that we buy hotels or buy properties and that way we can predict what supply we can have in the country. It is an open platform and everything depends on the free market, and how many people want to enter,” said Muñoz.

Airbnb’s Public Policy and Government Relations Manager for Central America and the Caribbean participated in the Nica Tech Summit 2017, held last Saturday in Managua, and said that they are starting to socialize a little about what is the “Collaborative economy” and publicize the Airbnb platform, so that more people can participate and enjoy the benefits of the tourism sector.

Democratize tourism

“We see this platform as a way to democratize what tourism is, because it allows people who have traditionally not been able to participate to participate and receive benefits from that sector,” said the manager of Public Policy and Government Relations of Airbnb for Central America and Caribbean.

Muñoz pointed out that one of the characteristics of the “collaborative economy” is that it does not require a big investment.

In the case of Airbnb the idea is that a person who has a property, whether a whole house or a single vacated room, can enable and offer it through that application to more than 100 million users worldwide, and so generate income for the family.

Source: Airbnb ve oportunidad para promover otro tipo de turismo en Nicaragua • El Nuevo Diario

As part of the recently held Nica Tech Summit 2017 (21 January in Managua), the person who heads up Airbnb’s efforts in Central America spoke and had some interesting things to say, namely that more people using Airbnb to book their lodging in Nicaragua look for shared spaces, i.e. not a whole house but a room or two in a house with other occupants, be they Nicaraguan or foreigners.

The point Mr. Muñoz is making is that this is a higher percentage than other countries in the region and that it is a good thing because this means that, especially for first-time visitors to Nicaragua, they can get a more locals perspective and experience than they would if they didn’t interact with actual Nicaraguans or expats at their rental properties.

Here at El Porton Verde, we certainly believe that, especially for your first and/or last night in Nicaragua, it’s good to get a very comfortable experience and one that is much more personalized than one that you might get just staying at a regular hotel or hostel.

When you are living with a family you get to eat the food they eat, listen and learn about what their lives are all about, and have a chance to ask questions as a visitor that just doesn’t happen in a more corporate or chain hotel type of situation.

As I’ve posted before, I think it’s completely legit to ask the first-time visitor, “why stay at a chain hotel when you can stay with us?” Not only does the visitor get more value for their dollar, yen, euro, pound, etc. you get the experience that totally supersedes having a room at a chain hotel that is pretty much like any other hotel room in that chain. I mean, a Holiday Inn is a Holiday Inn, amiright? 🙂

Another benefit of staying with a place like El Portón Verde is that you get to ask about things like relocation, medical tourism, local tours, beach house rentals, rental car tips, driving tips, and a bunch of other topics that you won’t get any exposure to in a more traditional lodging option like a big hotel chain.

If this doesn’t convince you, I don’t know what will? If you have a question about the value proposition that places like El Portón Verde offers, please comment below!

2017 Best Honeymoon Destinations – Top 17 Places to Go for Your Honeymoon

Nicaragua

One of you dreams of lying on the beach, and the other wants to soak up local culture and have once-in-a-lifetime adventures? If that’s the case, where to honeymoon may just be the easiest compromise you’ll make in your entire marriage. Nicaragua is the tropical destination guaranteed to please both adrenaline junkies and relaxation seekers. An ideal mix of exotic and easy, it’s a short, direct flight from Miami, Atlanta, Dallas, and Los Angeles, and U.S. dollars are accepted everywhere (along with the local currency, cordobas). It’s also a place where you can surf in the Pacific Ocean or down mountains of volcanic ash, zip line along cloud forests, tour Spanish colonial cities and sunbathe along the Caribbean coast—all in the same week if that’s how you roll. (Before your parents start having flashbacks to news anchors discussing the post-revolutionary conflict of the 1980s, reassure them that Nicaragua is the safest country in Latin America according to the Gallup Law and Order Index.) And while it’s more undiscovered and less developed than neighboring Costa Rica, Nicaragua’s tourist infrastructure is growing quickly and thoughtfully—meaning you’ll have your pick of luxury eco-resorts to serve as home base. Where to Stay: The closest thing to having your own private island is a room at Jicaro Island Ecolodge on one of the 365 islets that dot vast Lake Cocibolca. It’s just off the waterfront of the lovely colonial town of Granada, where the Tribal Hotel is the most Insta-ready option among a plethora of inns in converted mansions whose central courtyards now hold small swimming pools. Mukul is the swankiest spot on the Pacific coast, set between an incredible surfing beach and a top of the line golf course; or Maderas Village is the perfect option for modern, free-spirited couples who enjoy waking up in the jungle before taking a morning swim at Playa Maderas, a five-minute walk down the hill. Inland, brand-new Nekupe is an intimate sporting lodge on a 1,300-acre nature reserve where rangers guide you through horseback riding, skeet shooting, and cultural excursions (an on-site spa is set to open this spring). To see a completely different part of Nicaragua (and one most tourists miss) fly to the Caribbean side of the country for a stay at Yemaya on Little Corn Island. If all of the brand-new rooms with private plunge pools are booked, fear not—the turquoise waters of the Caribbean are just a few steps away. When to Go: It’s beach-weather warm year-round, but May-November is the rainy season, with short tropical showers and more cloud cover, especially in September and October. December-April is drier and (even) hotter. – Eleni N. Gage, Author of The Ladies of Managua.

Source: 2017 Best Honeymoon Destinations – Top 17 Places to Go for Your Honeymoon

The author makes a strong point that Nicaragua is an especially good honeymoon destination for couples who have a bit of a difference of opinion in what they want for their experience. In Nicaragua you can have the awesome tropical beaches and a real cultural experience in the same package. In fact, it might be the easiest compromise of your marriage! If you are looking to plan your honeymoon in Nicaragua, get in contact with us and we can help you plan your once-in-a-lifetime new beginning together! A splurge on luxury travel at Mukul, Nekupe, Rancho Santana or Yemaya might be the call!

14 stunning photos of exploration in the Masaya volcano • El Nuevo Diario

The images shared by Sam Cossman after the first week of work in the active volcano

Source: 14 stunning photos of exploration in the Masaya volcano • El Nuevo Diario

Photo: Alejandro Sánchez
The Team of Sam Cossman installs 80 sensors in the interior of the Masaya Volcano.

First Luxury Countryside Resort Opens in Nicaragua | Business Wire

First Luxury Countryside Resort Opens in Nicaragua

Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat, an Intimate Eight-Room Nature-Driven Property Located on Expansive 1,300-Acre Reserve, Fosters a Spirit of Exploration, Adventure and Wellbeing

Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat (Photo: Business Wire)

Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat (Photo: Business Wire)

NANDAIME, Nicaragua–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat, an intimate eight-room property located on a 1,300-acre nature reserve in Nicaragua, today debuts as the country’s first luxury countryside resort. Located 30 minutes from the historic colonial town of Granada, Nekupe fosters a spirit of exploration, adventure and wellbeing through its understated and culturally sensitive design that was influenced by Feng Shui principles, immersive activities, and indoor, outdoor living that provides guests with a rich sense of place.

#Nicaragua’s first luxury countryside resort opens! #NekupeSportingResortandRetreat

Tweet this

Experiences at Nekupe are rooted in an active-outdoor lifestyle ideal for multi-generational families, groups of friends or adventurous retreats that include exploration, hiking, tennis, horseback riding, sporting clay and target shooting, and more. These activities are complemented by opportunities for thoughtful inner reflection through mountain-top yoga overlooking majestic views of Mombacho Volcano, outdoor spa treatments utilizing native ingredients, meditation and nature walks.

Nekupe was conceived as a private family retreat by Nicaraguan philanthropists Don Alfredo Pellas and Doña Theresita Pellas, avid travelers and adventure enthusiasts whose commitment to nature is exhibited through the resort’s core principle of respect for the environment. They created a sanctuary, reforesting more than 14,000 trees, building water reservoirs, and nurturing local wildlife, with the desire of cultivating a destination where guests may enjoy shared experiences in a meaningful way.

“Nekupe, which means ‘heaven’ in Chorotega – the indigenous language of a native tribe in Nicaragua, has been a true passion to bring to life, driven by the love for our country, its breathtakingly raw beauty, cultural heritage and kind people,” said Don Alfredo Pellas. “We are excited to see Nekupe and Nicaragua evolve into destinations where guests will reconnect with nature and each other through relaxing and invigorating experiences.”

  • Accommodations – Guests may buy out the entire eight-room resort or book any of the following accommodations individually. Each room comes with a luxury ATV to navigate the miles of natural terrain.
    • La Residencia de Doña Theresita – Perched atop a hill to allow for views across the reserve and out to Mombacho Volcano is the 24,000-square-foot main residential compound, La Residencia de Doña Theresita. The residence houses two grand suites, each measuring 1,300 square feet, which overlook a 1,900-square-foot deck that includes an infinity plunge pool with grand vistas of the deep forest. It also houses two standard 870-square-foot suites, a full kitchen and recreational pool.
    • Villas – Four standalone villas that range from 700-1,000 square feet, each with an open terrace and floor-to-ceiling windows, are nestled along the countryside offering guests an immersive indoor/outdoor experience. Guests will enjoy access to the neighboring dry river outlined with giant bromeliads and impressive rock fountains.
  • Central Lobby – Nekupe’s central lobby, Casa Club, is a communal space with airy living and lounge options to enjoy a cocktail or convene to coordinate the day’s activities. The 10,800-square-foot lounge also houses the resort’s restaurant, Don Alfredo’s, a gift shop and pool court where guests may take in panoramic views of the Nicaraguan landscape, including a stunning view of Nicaragua’s majestic Mombacho Volcano.
  • Outdoor Pursuits – Nekupe’s incomparable setting is highlighted by its roster of extraordinary outdoor experiences taking advantage of the varied terrain full of trails, manmade nature pools and babbling creeks. A designated Ranger Center will guide guests through on- and off-site activities including:
    • On-site: Horseback riding, sporting clay and target shooting, ropes course, fully equipped fitness center, tennis, butterfly and birdwatching, stargazing, marimba classes, swimming in the recreational pool and folkloric dance lessons.
    • Off-site: Day tours to Granada and the Islets, volcano hiking and sandboarding, surfing, golfing, cultural tours and coffee plantation tours.
  • Culinary Offerings – Guests will enjoy traditional Nicaraguan dishes with a modern interpretation using a bounty of native ingredients, inspired by Doña Theresita’s own cooking and sourced from the on-site garden and local purveyor. For those in search of more bespoke menu items, the resort’s chef may customize any meal to suit culinary needs. An outdoor chef’s table and exhibition kitchen serves as the backdrop for cooking classes and bespoke dinners. Hand-crafted cocktails and cigar and rum tastings complement the culinary delights.
  • Wellness – A sanctuary for the soul, Nekupe’s peaceful and intimate reserve serves as a restorative destination that invites guests to benefit from the area’s healing energy and attributes. Travelers are invited to embrace the calm and inner peace afforded by this natural countryside oasis through meditative practices on the resort’s expansive yoga deck that overlooks the rolling reserve out to Concepción and Maderas Volcanos.
  • Chapel – Perched atop one of the highest points in the nature reserve and surrounded by trees that bloom the fragrant sacuanjoche flower, lies the resort’s Chapel San Francisco de Asis. With stone walls and wooden trim, the stately venue immediately impresses with its simple, yet elegant nature; thoughtful design, including an Italian bell customized for Don Alfredo and Doña Theresita; and breathtaking fountain that streams water to the baptistery. Whether guests opt for a leisure stroll or ride up the hill, they will take solace in the calming energy of the journey. The chapel is available for guests to meditate and use as a venue for intimate weddings and events.
  • Spa – A cornerstone of the resort, Nekupe Spa gives more than a nod to its inspired location set amidst lush vegetation. Embracing all energy points of the property, select native-based treatments utilizing natural ingredients will be available in the Casa Club and designated meadows within the reserve starting November 2016. The spa’s full concept will debut in 2017. Guests will enjoy views of the sprawling locale and hear nature’s meditative soundtrack while experiencing restorative treatments created to nourish and restore in this unspoiled setting.

Nekupe, an hour-and-a-half drive from Augusto Cesar Sandino International Airport, will offer rates beginning at $750 per night. Rates include breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks; non-alcoholic beverages; one ATV per accommodation; and select activities on property. For reservations and additional information, visit www.nekupe.com.

Nicaragua, known as the land of lakes and volcanoes, is Central America’s hottest travel destination. It offers travelers one-of-a-kind experiences due to its vast natural beauty – all set amidst a backdrop of striking colonial architecture, charming culture and the warmth of its people.

About Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat

Nicaragua’s first luxury countryside resort, Nekupe Sporting Resort and Retreat, is an intimate eight-room property located on a 1,300-acre nature reserve. Offering a seamless confluence of sustainable nature-based design with Feng Shui influences, rich Nicaraguan culture and warm hospitality, the property effortlessly blends with the environment to nurture exploration, adventure and wellbeing. Nekupe is the vision of Nicaraguan philanthropists Don Alfredo and Doña Theresita Pellas, avid travelers and adventure enthusiasts whose commitment to nature is exhibited through the resort’s core principles of respect and stewardship of the environment.

Contacts

Murphy O’Brien Public Relations
MJ Salcido
310.453.2539
nekupe@murphyobrien.com

Source: First Luxury Countryside Resort Opens in Nicaragua | Business Wire

El Portón Verde Tours Visits the Masaya Volcano at Night, Sees Lava! (VIDEO)

Night Tour of the Masaya Volcano with Active, Jumping Lava!

Masaya Volcano Night Tour

Same spot, at night.

IMG_2685

Masaya Volcano in day

Masaya Volcano in day

Hello kind reader(s) and robots:

With our group of three brothers and one cousin all visiting Nicaragua together, we went during the daytime and again at nighttime to visit the Masaya Volcano National Park yesterday. Here is my report:

I was there last night (23 June) and yes you can see the lava quite well. It’s pretty well down in the Santiago crater but very visible, especially from the main promontory and also on the left side of there.

Access is quite well controlled and they do limit your time. My group and I went during the daytime too so we could visit the visitor’s center, well worth it IMO. During the day they weren’t all that strict about the time limit. There was only one park ranger and he couldn’t really keep track of all the people. However, it is officially forbidden to walk the trails. The bat cave tours also are suspended.

So back the the night tour, you can start queuing up in your vehicle beginning at 5:30 pm but I would recommend waiting like we did until about 6 or 6:30 so it is totally dark when you get up to the top. You pay $10 per personl it doesn’t matter if you are a national or foreigner. You drive up to the visitors center, which is closed after 4:30, but there is a gate there and they use that to queue up perhaps twenty vehicles at a time to allow a cohort of vehicles to drive up together.
When you get up to the parking area of the crater, try to maximize your viewing time as they are limiting the time up there to fifteen minutes. I could have watched the lava for hours as it is incredibly mesmerizing. You can also hear the sounds of the lava and it appeared that there are two currents coming in from the west and east and when the pulses coincide there is a wave of sorts…as I say, mesmerizing.
There are maybe two or three park rangers up there at the crater at night and they are in communication with the other rangers at the gates, so when time is up they use a whistle to implore everyone to get back in their cars and go back down. As you’re going down, the next cohort of vehicles is making its way up.

I hope that helps and I know for a fact you will enjoy what you see! I believe there are only three places in the world where you can see something similar, Kileaua (sic) in Hawaii, someplace in Africa, and good ‘ole Nicaragua!

Cheers, Mike @ El Portón Verde, Managua

Link to video

El Rosario, the highest waterfall in Nicaragua | el19digital.com

El Rosario, the highest waterfall in Nicaragua

Sunday 29 May 2016 | Carlos Espinoza Flores
One kilometer before reaching the town of El Rosario, the municipality of Murra, one deviates to the left and begins to skirt the mountain through a road where a vehicle can barely reach. After a little less than 1 kilometer there is a small house and a corral. One must continue 2 kilometers more. Upon completion, the road widens, the mountain stands tall as a skyscraper and through its walls a huge waterfall rushes majestic. It is the El Rosario waterfall, the highest in Nicaragua.The waterfall is staggered, but in winter is so strong that it literally has been eating the mountain, removing huge rocks that form small pools feet. Needless to say, the clearness of the current, the exuberance of the trees, the cheerful birdsong is amazing. If you didn’t know it was real, you’d think it is a canvas of Eden.

An elderly gentleman, white-skinned with a thick and quixotic mustache, looks up and fixes his eyes to where you can see as the summit from where the waterfall starts to rush. He is a simple man, like every farmer in northern Nicaragua, however, he has that look of pride. Why? Because the waterfall is entirely within his property.

Cascada El Rosario, in Murra, Nicaragua

His name is Juan Antonio Moreno. He is 63 years old, of which 40 he has lived among these mountains. The property is called Selva Morena, and if you take a good look around, you’ll see there is no more appropriate name, since contrary to the pine forests that characterize Las Segovias, in El Rosario vegetation is dense and varied.

Don Juan hosted a group of climbers that reached the waterfall and measured it. The end result was 120 meters high. To put it in perspective, the Estanzuela waterfall in Esteli, is 35 meters, so it is three three times higher.

Tucked between the mountains this man is no stranger to climate changes experienced by the world and the impact it is having on nature. He states that to prevent the waterfall from drying out, he has not ceased to reforest the area.

Cascada El Rosario, in Murra, Nicaragua

“It is worth taking care of the forest. I was born with that gift of caring for the forest , “he says.

“That’s why it has remained (the cascade)”, he stresses.

The property is more than 100 blocks of virgin forest that also serve as a refuge for hundreds of wild animals.

Cascada El Rosario, in Murra, Nicaragua

virgin Tourism

Contrary to other places in Nicaragua, where tourism development is booming, in this hidden paradise itself there is absolutely nothing. There are no benches, no farms, no restaurant, only friendly welcome Don Juan, who opened a small path to climb up the waterfall and stole a forest space so that visitors could park their vehicles.

Don Juan does not even have an access fee. “He who brings how to reward the leaves and not always comes , he says.

However, he says that soon and start charging.

Even though lacks any tourist infrastructure, visitors have been amazed not only by the impressive waterfall but by the love with which Don Juan protects nature.

“I have been congratulated for the care of the forest because if there is no forest there is no water , he says.

Cascada El Rosario, in Murra, Nicaragua

An adventure trip

Getting to the waterfall is not easy. To give an idea of how far it is, just say it takes 2 hours travel by car from Ocotal, Nueva Segovia, to the valley where the small town of El Rosario rises. From Managua it is 332 kilometers, 52 of which are dirt roads.

These 52 kilometers are an adventure themselves. They run between the crests of the mountains, with deep pits to either side or long descending slopes whose lower part are cut by streams, to once again be crossed when you have to climb the steep peaks.

Cascada El Rosario, in Murra, Nicaragua

It is a postcard-perfect Nicaragua: adobe huts, the farmers mule, ox carts, jungle covered mountains, pine forests, coffee plantations, cattle grazing.

On the way it is not common to find vehicles and public transport with the municipality lending trucks with big tires and strong high bodies.

It is a Nicaragua that is slowly disappearing. Simple, beautiful, clean air and working people. If this place is not paradise, it lacks little to be.

Source: El Rosario, la cascada más alta de Nicaragua

To My Friends and Family: Please come visit me in Nicaragua

Cordial Invite? Friends and Family, Please Visit El Porton Verde and Experience Nicaragua!

To my friends and family: I am officially inviting you to come and visit Nicaragua this year. Maybe Nicaragua isn’t for…

Posted by Mike Quinn on Saturday, March 26, 2016

What’s this all about anyway?

I want you to visit Nicaragua. It’s time, really, like this year, 2016 let’s make this happen! I can customize your travel itinerary for you based on what you want to do and with whom you would like to do it! Just contact me and even if I’ve never met you, you’ll still get the “friends and family” treatment!
Partial list of what’s on offer:

Give me an idea, what’s a “typical” Nicaraguan vacation include?

You will fly into Managua International Airport where as soon as you get out of customs, heading towards the area of the rental cars, you will see my smiling face! A lot of flight arrive sort of late at night, so you and your travel companions can stay with us at the farm that first night.

When you wake up, you’ll see a wonderful view, enjoy a tasty farm-fresh breakfast, with ingredients from the farm, and we’ll plan out that first day. There are lots of things to do in the local area, colonial towns, big lakes, crater lakes, volcanoes, waterfalls, beaches, etc., so you can easily spend a couple of days partaking in that and getting your feet wet so to speak.

Then we can figure out what your particular interests are and make sure those fantastic travel experiences happen for you. Here are some possibilities:

And ideally you will plan to have the time to do a number of the above listed items or we can discover even more, this is only a partial listing!

visit Nicaragua

Swimming pool, tranquility and volcano views guaranteed!

Time of year to travel | Lonely Planet

What is the best time of year to travel to Nicaragua?

The one where a family wants to travel to Nicaragua and wants to know what is the best time of year to travel to Nicragua. Hint: The rainy season isn’t bad! From the Lonely Planet Nicaragua travel forum.

Hi folks,

We are a family with two kids, 7 and 2, that are very much wanting to travel independently in Nicaragua. We are seasoned travelers, that isn’t an issue, but as it is our first time to Central America we are mainly wondering about weather at the time of year available. We are most likely looking at either a few weeks in the end of May to mid June, or the month of July. I have read that this is the rainy season? We were thinking of a few locations only, probably basing in Granada, but also are interested in Otega and Little Corn, maybe also a few days at least in some off-the-beaten-track little town in a local hotel where there is nothing in particular to do. lol. But is this literally the worst time to go? We don’t want to do the beach every day or anything, but a month of crappy raining weather would suck, especially with the kids. Advice? Thanks

Greetings DBN9663: You have an excellent response already, that the rainy season isn’t like an all-day deluge, but more typically either afternoon thundershowers or better yet, raining at night time. So you can plan your outings in the morning and be almost guaranteed to have good weather. On Corn Island the rain comes more frequently and there’s not such a distinct wet/dry season as there is on the Pacific coast, but it’s usually a short rain that clears up after a bit.
To add to that a little, the “normal” rainy season begins in mid-May but the weather has been anything but normal for a few years now. In fact, the first part of the rainy season has been extremely dry on the Pacific side in recent years. So, that said, it might be better to come in July if that’s an option as it might be that most of May would still be the end of the hot/dry season, which typically is April to the beginning of the rainy season.
By July the rainy season should hopefully be in full swing, fingers crossed! What with the El Niño year, its not clear how that might affect our rainy season in Nicaragua. The forecast maps say it will be dry further north and wet further south but who knows, right?
It’s just weather anyway, so go ahead an plan a great trip for your family!

Cheers, Mike @ El Portón Verde, Managua

Source: Time of year to travel

Best time to travel to Nicaragua

It’s typically rainer on the Caribbean coast.