4 Reasons Why Nicaragua Should be Your Next Getaway – Culture-ist

4 Reasons Why Nicaragua Should be Your Next Getaway

featured 4 Reasons Why Nicaragua Should be Your Next Getaway

This Post was originally published on the Absolute Travel Blog

read the rest at: 4 Reasons Why Nicaragua Should be Your Next Getaway – Culture-ist.

My comments:

Well, of course that is sort of the thing with “luxury hotels” which is where this story focuses. They seem to be run for wealthy clientele who don’t wish to see the poverty, corruption, etc. (To the commentors on the linked-to page) Would that be a surprise for you?

I can tell you that if you come down for a visit (and why don’t you want to see for yourself?) you will find that this country is very beautiful and the culture quite vividly real. If you want luaus, all-inclusive resorts, and mass consumerist experiences, you probably should not come to Nicaragua. It is a real place with good and bad.

My rec: Best to get the “soft landing” treatment when you are picked up at the airport, taken to your lodging, and helped along with the rest of your trip from there…and if you don’t forget “todo es una aventura” then you’ll be fine.


Kayaking to the Jungle in Nicaragua – NYTimes.com

Kayaking to the Jungle in NicaraguaKayaking to the Jungle in Nicaragua - NYTimes.com

Kayaking to the Jungle in Nicaragua – NYTimes.com.

Go while you can, as this kayaking tour advertised through the New York Times’ In Transit blog, goes through the Indio Maiz Biosphere reserve which will be traversed by the Nicaraguan Interoceanic Canal in a few years.  Construction is due to begin this year so best to book now. Of course, here at the Farmstay we could book a similar trip for much less then what you pay with the advertised tour group!

 


Alarm as Nicaragua starts canal route survey – Yahoo News

Alarm as Nicaragua starts canal route survey

Associated Press

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, Rodolfo Molina, an 81-year-old retired mechanic, dries rice for storage outside his home where he has lived for 40 years in Rivas, Nicaragua. Rivas is the town where the first phase of an Inter-Oceanic canal is planned to be built in 2014. Teams from the China-based HKND Group have been interviewing property owners in Rivas, alarming homeowners who fear they'll lose their homes. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)
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FILE – In this Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, Rodolfo Molina, an 81-year-old retired mechanic, dries rice for storage outside his home where he has lived for 40 years in Rivas, Nicaragua. Rivas is the town where the first phase of an Inter-Oceanic canal is planned to be built in 2014. Teams from the China-based HKND Group have been interviewing property owners in Rivas, alarming homeowners who fear they’ll lose their homes. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)

MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP) — Teams of assessors accompanied by soldiers and police have begun surveying properties along the route of Nicaragua’s planned interoceanic canal, taking quick steps toward the start of a vast project the country has dreamed of for more than a century.

But the process is alarming many residents, who say they fear they’ll lose their homes and receive unfair compensation.

Teams from the China-based HKND Group this month began interviewing property owners in the Brito River region in southwest Nicaragua, where the first phase of the $40 billion, 173-mile (278-kilometer) canal is supposed to be built starting late this year.

“The census is normal. We had announced that we would go house by house, farm by farm, to see what they have, what they don’t have,” Canal Commission spokesman Telemaco Talavera said Tuesday. He said the purpose is to assess the value of properties “to pay them what is just for each one.”

But some property owners have complained that the joint Chinese-Nicaraguan teams are accompanied by police or soldiers, as well as representatives of the attorney general’s office.

Read the rest here: Alarm as Nicaragua starts canal survey – Yahoo News.

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, Rodolfo Molina, an 81-year-old retired mechanic, dries rice for storage outside his home where he has lived for 40 years in Rivas, Nicaragua. Rivas is the town where the first phase of an Inter-Oceanic canal is planned to be built in 2014. Teams from the China-based HKND Group have been interviewing property owners in Rivas, alarming homeowners who fear they'll lose their homes. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)

FILE – In this Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, Rodolfo Molina, an 81-year-old retired mechanic, dries rice for storage outside his home where he has lived for 40 years in Rivas, Nicaragua. Rivas is the town where the first phase of an Inter-Oceanic canal is planned to be built in 2014. Teams from the China-based HKND Group have been interviewing property owners in Rivas, alarming homeowners who fear they’ll lose their homes. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)

 

So here is where the first major challenge is with this “canal project.” I put quotation marks on it because if I were to guess, this is just a way for the current Nicaraguan government to get back into the land confiscation business, albeit this time with a veneer of legitimacy due to the outlandish terms of the agreement made with HKND, the Chinese firm that has the contract to build and operate the canal.

I find it interesting that  the path of the proposed canal also happens to be some of the most highly valued properties in Nicaragua. Lakefront, oceanfront, along the corridors of movement of goods and people, etc.

 


Surfing Vacation – Cheap – Family Vacation – Nicaragua Forum – TripAdvisor

3. Re: Surfing Vacation – Cheap – Family Vacation

Aug 24, 2014, 2:01 PM

Greetings Colleen:

I think the best setup as far as comfortable beach vacations for a surfing family would be renting a house. The first place that comes to mind is Playa Iguana near Tola. There are several rentals there on offer. In addition to vrbo, flipkey, etc. check the local craigslist too. There are two great breaks right there and it is close to several more. Another similar place that in my mind is even better as the views are outstanding is Rancho Santana.

More of the obvious possibilities are San Juan del Sur, Popoyo, Playa Gigante, etc.

Then there are the Top Four Off-the-Beaten Path Surfing and Fishing Villages…

elportonverde.com/2013/…

Cheers, Mike @ Farmstay El Porton Verde, Managua

via Surfing Vacation – Cheap – Family Vacation – Nicaragua Forum – TripAdvisor.KoaSmith_WP_6966Watts

Best Nicaragua Surfing Vacations

Some of the best Nicaragua surfing vacations can be booked right here with El Porton Verde! With our extensive network of small beachfront inns and private homes to rent, your dream tropical surf vacation can be made into a reality!

For more surf vacation ideas, see Top Four Off-the-Beaten-Path Surfing and Fishing Villages. As I wrote on that post, there are some really nice surf spots in Nicaragua that are not very well known and most of the surfers do not make it to those areas.

A little secret from one of the “Nicaragua Insiders” is that even though I wrote about four different places, there are at least a half-dozen more that I did not mention that meet the same general criteria! You can’t expect me to leave it all out there hanging in the wind so-to-speak, did you?

Okay, I will give you one more not in the “Top Four.” Salinas Grandes, in the department of Leon. A really fine open beachbreak when on, smaller surf preferred. Another “end-of-the-road” type of place. There are a few places to stay now and a gorgeous sunset is practically guaranteed!

As vianica.com puts it:

Salinas Grande Beach can be the best choice for those who are looking for a rarely frequented beach with great waves and wants to be in touch with nature.

We can’t (and won’t!) argue with that!


Projects – WeVol Inc.

Current WeVol Projects:

Nicaragua assessment:

The WeVol team is currently assessing project opportunities in Nicaragua.  Please stay tuned for more information on prospective projects – more will be known and posted in early September.

via Projects – WeVol Inc..

So cool that the Farmstay just hosted the WeVol Projects team! We couldn’t be any more thrilled to meet such fine people who want to share their passion with folks here in Nicaragua.


Shuttle Prices Nicaragua – NicaRide.com

DAILY SHUTTLES

FROM            TO       DEPARTURE TIMES      PRICE PER PERSON

Granada San Juan del Sur       10am, 1:30pm        $16 USD

Granada Managua Airport          4am, 9am           $20 USD

Granada         Leon           11:30am               $18 USD

San Juan del Sur       Granada     9:30am, 12:30pm               $16 USD

Private Shuttle Deposit

via Shuttle Prices Nicaragua – NicaRide.com.

Good prices on shuttles out of Granada! A good alternative to private shuttle as it’s less costly but nicer and more comfortable then public buses. $18 Granada to Leon isn’t bad IMO.


Why Nicaraguan Kids Aren’t Fleeing To U.S. | KPBS

Why Nicaraguan Kids Aren’t Fleeing To U.S.

It is Central America’s poorest country, but its kids aren’t heading north like those in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras

Nicaraguans at a political march in the capital Managua. August 28, 2005

Above: Nicaraguans at a political march in the capital Managua. August 28, 2005

Republican Congressman Darrell Issa of Vista recently returned from a fact-finding mission to Central America and blamed impoverished economies for the unprecedented number of children entering the U.S. illegally.

Aired 7/29/14 on KPBS News.

Nicaragua is Central America’s poorest country, yet its children aren’t fleeing to the border along with their Salvadoran, Guatemalan and Honduran neighbors. Experts say that’s because of the country’s low crime rate, effective police force and unique migration history.

Issa said the new arrivals should be expeditiously deported.

But if economics is the main trigger, why aren’t kids also coming from Nicaragua, Central America’s poorest country and one that has strong ties to the U.S., dating back to the 1970s?

The U.S. Border Patrol apprehended just 178 Nicaraguan children sneaking across the border alone between Oct. 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, compared to 16,546 children from Honduras, the origin of the greatest number of children apprehended.

Nicaragua has extreme poverty, but it lacks what the White House and experts on the region have also attributed as a cause for the migration: high crime and violence.

A map shows Mexico and the countries in Central America — Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia.

A map shows Mexico and the countries in Central America — Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia.

The alarming influx of children and families from Central America has fueled demonstrations and debate over U.S. immigration policy and the causes of the emigration. Most of the children are from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.

Nicaragua is striking in its absence from the pool of child immigrants and from America’s national conversation about them.

It is the second poorest country in Latin America, behind Haiti. It is sandwiched between Honduras on the north and Costa Rica on the south.

more here–> Why Nicaraguan Kids Aren’t Fleeing To U.S. | KPBS.

Thanks for this article and the generally good reporting coming out of NPR and PBS on Nicaragua. I find it interesting that our US representatives find it difficult to distinguish between someone who tries to emigrate based on purely economical reasons and someone who flees basically because they are afraid for their lives.
People in Nicaragua are emigrating for economic reasons whereas the other countries severe security and safety issues which drives more emigrations.

While the economy has been good in Nicaragua in recent years, it still is the the second poorest in the hemisphere. But now lots of investment is coming from other Central American countries due to the relatively good safety and security of the country. I guess it just shows you that people can live poor but in a safe environment. If you are both poor and insecure, then all bets are off. Maybe that is why other countries are looking at the policing techniques used here.

Cheers, Mike @ Farmstay El Porton Verde, Managua


The Black Ship | Motmot Magazine | Nicaragua English Language Magazine: News Culture Travel

The Black Ship

APR 16 • CULTURE, FOLKLORE • 616 VIEWS • COMMENTS OFF

They scream “Where are we? Where is Granada? Please help us!” But no one answers and then the wind pulls the boat back into the darkness.

They scream “Where are we? Where is Granada? Please help us!” But no one answers and then the wind pulls the boat back into the darkness.

Many myths and legends are shared among the Central American countries and Mexico since the individual countries were formed after the times of most of the legends. The Black Ship, however, is one that is unique to Nicaragua.

San Carlos was a sleepy little village at the mouth of the mighty San Juan River back when the waters ran deep. Large galleons coming from the Caribbean would drop off goods from Europe and bring word from other countries. Galleons were sailing ships in use from the 15th through 17th centuries, originally as a warship and later for trade. These galleons were mainly square-rigged and usually had three or more decks and masts. Smaller sailing ships would pick up some of these goods from San Carlos along with livestock and grains from the local farmers for delivery to Granada, Ometepe, and other islands along the way. This is a story about one of those smaller sailing ships that left San Carlos heading for Granada.

for the rest of the story, see The Black Ship | Motmot Magazine | Nicaragua English Language Magazine: News Culture Travel.

One of the very interesting aspects of Nicaraguan culture is the active and very much alive tradition of storytelling, myths and legends. They even have a museum in Leon which is really an interesting stop. I took some visitors with children there a couple of weeks ago and they really enjoyed it!